The symbolism of cherry blossoms in Japan 桜花の意味

  • Published on : 20/11/2019
  • by : Ph.L
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Cerisiers au pic de floraison

Cherry trees at peak bloom

Soichi Masuhara

A thousand-year-old symbol

Traditionally associated with the hanami festivities, the cherry blossom is a very important symbol for the Japanese. Much more than just a flower, it's part of an age-old philosophy and today, the emblem of an entire nation.

Hanami, un moment de convivialité

Hanami, un moment de convivialité

Fick/ kawabata

Even today, the cherry blossoms of the hanami inspire those of all ages and walks of life, and whether through poems, songs, or personal reflection, their falling petals remind us that life is short and must be savored.

It is a time of reflection, appreciation of beauty, and impermanence. The timing of hanami could not be any better as it is a season of transition as students begin their new school year, recent graduates transitioning to careers, and the beginning of a new season.

Jeux traditionnels avec les geisha au Nihonbashi sakura festival

Jeux traditionnels avec les geisha au Nihonbashi sakura festival

http://www.nihonbashi-tokyo.jp/en/special/sakura2017/

La rentrée sous les cerisiers

La rentrée sous les cerisiers

Flick/ ThirtyFive Millimeter

A national identity symbol

Poetic and philosophical, the cherry blossom is the identity and symbol of the archipelago. The symbol of the Japanese government since the Nara period (710-794)!

Originally chosen to stand out from China whose emblem was the plum blossom, the cherry blossom has since been the subject of many diversions throughout Japanese history.

 

Kanazawa Castle Park

Kanazawa Castle Park castle

Kimon Berlin

Des cerisiers en Corée du Sud

Des cerisiers en Corée du Sud

Flick/ f0rtytwo

Des cerisiers à Taiwan

Des cerisiers à Taiwan

Flick/ j770503rex

As for the Japanese, the cherry blossom is a symbol of hope and comfort during the second World War.

Perceived as a familiar symbol for the Japanese, it was then taken up by the government of the time to unify a nation weakened by war. Whether in the form of metaphors in political speeches or drawings of kamikaze bombers, sakura is becoming ubiquitous on the archipelago. It symbolizes a strong and united people and forming the hopes of an entire nation.

Des kamikazes et leurs avions dans les années 1940

Des kamikazes et leurs avions dans les années 1940

Flick/ rich701

Un avion de Kamikaze

Un avion de Kamikaze

Flick/ Ouij

Une fleur de cerisier sur un avion de kamikaze

Une fleur de cerisier sur un avion de kamikaze

Flick/ chenrySTL

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