Attending a tea ceremony in Japan 日本での茶道に出席する

  • Published on : 19/05/2020
  • by : J.R.
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Où assister à une cérémonie du thé au Japon ?

La cérémonie du thé est un véritable art traditionnel codifié au Japon, lors de laquelle on déguste du thé vert matcha accompagné d’une pâtisserie. Sur place, il est possible de participer à cette cérémonie qui se tient dans une maison du thé.

Maiko thé

Maiko préparant du thé

Wikimedia Commons

cérémonie du thé

Le thé est fouetté lors de la cérémonie

Wikimedia Commons

Tea Houses in Tokyo

  • The Imperial Hotel Toko-an is without doubt one of the best places in Tokyo to attend a tea ceremony. This prestigious hotel located in Chiyoda offers a 20-minute ceremony, with tea and pastry, at 2,200 Yen (around US $20) per person, all in a very traditional zen setting.
  • Nadeshiko is a kimono rental company located in Asakusa. Participating in a tea ceremony will cost you 4,000 Yen (US $37) or 5,000 Yen (US $46) if you wish to attend wearing a kimono.
  • Experience a tea ceremony at the Museum of bonsai Shunkaen, east of Tokyo. Reserve your place now on Voyagin, for around US $37.
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Apprenez de l'expérience des professionnels

Patrick Vierthaler

Tea ceremonies in Kyoto

The ancient capital of Japan Kyoto is full of tea houses

  • The Camellia Tea House, near the Kiyomizu temple, is particularly renowned in Kyoto. The calm and sunny place delivers an elegant ceremony. The experience costs 3,000 Yen (around US $28), for 45 minutes of an unforgettable experience.
  • Tea Ceremony at Ju-an, near Kyoto station. The ceremony is in English and guests have the origins of the ceremony explained. You can also practice making the tea yourself. The price is 2,850 Yen (US $26).
Camellia

Enjoy the tea ceremony in an authentic traditional Japanese house.

Camellia

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