Luggage delivery services   荷物

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Baggage .... major drawback travel, is not necessarily one!

Baggage .... major drawback travel, is not necessarily one!

The baggage claim, the time to find her bag.

The baggage claim, the time to find her bag.

The baggage check-in counters of airlines.

The baggage check-in counters of Japanese airlines.

In the subway, luggage are often drawbacks.

In the subway, luggage are often drawbacks.

Loading luggage on the train.

Loading luggage on the train.

Japanese stations often have lockers, convenient not to bother with luggage.

Japanese stations often have lockers, convenient not to bother with luggage.

No more headache stowing luggage in a small trunk.

No more headache stowing luggage in a small trunk.

Travel lighter

There's a major drawback of holiday luggage... carrying it! But there's good news - you can travel light without any problems in Japan. Door-to-door baggage services are fast, cheap and secure. So don't hold back, fill your bags with souvenirs!

Airport arrival and departure

With the time difference and long hours of flying, you might want to unload your bags so you can have your hands free when you first arrive in the country. To do this, send your luggage directly to the place where you'll be staying using a delivery service like JAL ABC or Takkyubin ( Ta-Q-Bin). Both have counters at the airport. Takkyubin has the advantage of not requiring reservations, and can even deliver your luggage on the same day in some cases. The price varies between 1,500 and 3,000 yen. This service will be especially valuable on your return, as your new memories will likely have turned into extra luggage! Similarly, it might be possible to use your airline as well. Please beware though, you may have to book at least two days before your departure.

Between the different stages of your trip

If you decide to go down to Kyoto from Tokyo for a few days and you don't want to deal with traveling with your heavy luggage, Takkyubin is the best solution. For a very reasonable price, you can have your luggage delivered to your next accommodation by the following day (depending on the distance from place to place). For example, a bag from Tokyo can be delivered the next day to Kyoto for only 1,900 yen, and for 2,200 yen to Kyushu.

For this delivery service, you can:

  • Apply by phone or via internet.

  • Bring your luggage to a "convenience store" (konbini). Takkyubin (indicated by a sticker of their logo, depicting two black cats) offers delivery services from these stores.

  • Bring your luggage to the Kuroneko Yamato counter (a delivery company that provides Takkyubin services) in your neighborhood. If you don't know where to find it, watch out for a delivery man in a green and yellow uniform wearing a cap and ask him. Kuroneko Yamato remains the country's largest delivery service, but there are others like Sagawa Express or Nittsu.

If you're staying in a hotel, employees can of course take care of all these steps for you. Click here to help you complete the mailing form yourself. You can also get them at the nearest konbini. Ask for a takkyubin no denpyo preferably "motobarai" (payable at time of shipment).

Travel

When taking public transportation, finding a place for your bulky luggage can prove to be a headache. Some cars have large trunks (luggage never goes on the roof in Japan), but the space for luggage on trains can be very limited. Beware of the following situations:

  • Traveling on weekends or holidays. The influx of people on public transportation can leave no room for yourself, let alone your luggage!

  • Taking a taxi. The usual type of car trunk can contain 2 to 3 bags at most. Larger minivan taxis are rare, so you might have to take several taxis if it comes to it.

  • Taking a bus or the subway during rush hour (between 8am and 9am, and between 6pm and 8pm in the evening). Faced with the lack of space for bulky items plus crowds of commuters, the trip may be a bit challenging for you and annoying for others.

There are elevators in all urban train stations...but sometimes it's like playing hide and seek. In Tokyo, for example, the crowds can make finding one very difficult. Stay alert and try to find the signs pointing to an elevator. Smaller stations in the countryside, however, will sometimes not have elevators or escalators. When traveling between cities, car rental may prove to be a practical solution because you won't have to worry about your bags. 

Locking up luggage

Airports, train stations and even large department stores offer locker services costing between 500 and 1000 yen. You will also find that there are usually many public lockers of different sizes as well.  For somewhere between 300 yen and 1,000 yen you can store you bags for one day (until midnight). One last thing: if you leave or lose your luggage somewhere, when traveling on a train for example, do not despair. Objects are rarely stolen and recovering lost property is not uncommon. Don't hesitate to tell train staff or contact the place where you might have left your baggage.


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