Ryokan customs   旅館習慣

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Inside a ryokan in Japan.

Inside a ryokan in Japan.

ryokan onsen

Often, ryokan have a rotenburo, an outdoor onsen.

A ryokan in Japan.

A ryokan in Japan.

A Ryôri kaiseki, meal consisting of many small dishes, often made from local ingredients.

A Ryôri kaiseki, meal consisting of many small dishes, often made from local ingredients.

To unwind, some ryokan offer a variety of entertainment.

To unwind, some ryokan offer a variety of entertainment.

Futons ryokan.

Futons ryokan.

In the ryokan, baths are not mixes but often alternate. Please do not go wrong!

In the ryokan, baths are not mixes but often alternate. Please do not go wrong!

The rules of serenity

Your trip to Japan would not be complete without a stay at a ryokan. These traditional Japanese hotels date back to the Edo period (1603-1868), and are used to accommodate travelers who roam Japan. A stay in a ryokan is a dive into Japanese aesthetics and spirit...which can be confusing. We'll give you some clues to the puzzle but not spoil the fun.

Where to find a ryokan?

Ryokan are found mainly in the spa towns. Often isolated from urban centers, they offer an onsen, or hot spring, and time of unparalleled relaxation. Of course, cities also have ryokans, but their water is not drawn directly from a source. The urban inn are more like traditional hotels. Quite luxurious, one night costs between 15,000 and 25,000 yen, generally including dinner and breakfast. From Tokyo, several ryokan are easily accessible in the cities of Kusatsu, Ikaho, Kinugawa or Shiba. A large amount of these places are in regions Izu and Hakone. From Kyoto, you can find them in Shirahama, Ohara, Kurama, Kinosaki, or Arima ... but these are only a sample of a much longer list. The archipelago has thousands of ryokans.

The arrival

The first impression on arrival at a traditional inn is critical. The lobby is therefore created with special care. Take time to admire the decor and various objets of art on display. Upon entering, you might have to take off your shoes, and if so slippers will be provided. Your hosts will take great care of your shoes, so do not worry. Sometimes the host serves tea with a little welcoming tidbit. The second thing to do is check the provided yukata (light cotton kimono), accompanied by a haori (jacket to put over the yukata) during cold seasons. Don't expect a bed in your room, you naturally sleep on a futon!

Bath

Changing into your yukata and taking a quick bath before dinner is not an obligation, but done by many. The yukata can be worn anywhere throughout your stay. During meals, when relaxing, and in spa towns, some customers even walk the streets in their yukata. At bath time, there is one area for men and one area for women, so be careful not to walk into the wrong area! However, these areas may alternate from one day to the other, as to let everyone enjoy the various facilities. Before entering the bath, take a shower at one of the many shower spaces usually located around the bath. Many ryokans also have rotenburo, or outdoor baths: a must do for a true onsen experience, especially in winter. Small personal baths can also be reserved, "Kashikiri" as they are called, can be booked at the reception desk. Your host will explain all this to you at your arrival. Many ryokan don't have private baths, though. So do not be offended or embarrassed to share a bath with other guests. In Japan, this is not taboo!

Meals

Dinner is usually taken early, between 6 pm and 7 pm. Depending on the ryokan, meals are served in your room or in the dining area. The type of food that you have is called "Kaiseki Ryôri," a meal consisting of many small dishes, often made ​​by the seasonal ingredients from that particular region. Enjoy with your eyes and your tongue these little wonders of gastronomy! Alcohol is not always included in the price of the meal, so it could added to your bill at the end of your stay. While you eat, employees often take the opportunity to make your futons, so they go into your rooms. The evening begins calmly with a second bath in the moonlight. The next day, breakfast is served in the same manner as dinner. Attention, it is rare that ryokan offer toast and coffee. Be prepared for a meal of rice, fish, miso soup and vegetables in the morning.

Other entertainment

What to do between baths and meals? Of course, if you are staying in a spa or resort town, the activities will not let you down. The city will have probably more natural or historic sites, and other hot springs. Ryokan often offer varied entertainment to relax and spend time: massage chairs, karaoke, video games, ping pong tables, etc. So a relaxing stay awaits you, without fears of boredom. Take time to relax at the hallmark of a Japanese experience.

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