Shunkaen Bonsai Museum   春花園盆栽美術館

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The Shunkaen Bonsai Museum holds a large collection of jars, prints and tools to maintain their thousand bonsai.

The Shunkaen Bonsai Museum holds a large collection of jars, prints and tools to maintain their thousand bonsai.

Every Sunday, the Shunkaen Museum offers classes to learn how to maintain a bonsai.

Every Sunday, the Shunkaen Museum offers classes to learn how to maintain a bonsai.

Despite its air of private property, Shunkaen is a museum.

Despite its air of private property, Shunkaen is a museum.

Miniature harmony

Since 2002, this small museum in Edogawa Shunkaen lets you discover the art of cutting these shrubs in respect for tradition and harmony.

Attention, the Sunkaen Bonsai Museum does not look like what you think, more like a private property than a museum ... but it contains a large collection of books, ancient pots and prints dedicated to beauty and the harmony of these world famous shrubs.

Serenity

Here, everything has tranquility, like the small pond around the teahouse style abode. Outside of a noisy Tokyo, this museum offers a clean, quiet, and traditional Japanese garden. In the yard facing the house, sits a 1000 year old pine, while inside bonsai trees number in the hundreds.

Visits are organized by apprentices from around the world, explaining to visitors the history of the bonsai cutting practice.

The art of cutting

The place also houses a school, and it is not uncommon for students to care for the shrubs. For lovers of bonsai, courses are offered every Sunday (some in English). They are led by Kunio Kobayashi, the creator of the museum, and by his students. All tools are provided, and all you need to do is buy a tree, sold at the establishment.

At the end of the visit, the museum offers a cup of green tea. One way to stay a little longer in the peaceful atmosphere while enjoying the work of cutting and aligning these small trees.

Enjoy a tea ceremony at the Bonsai Museum with Voyagin.

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